The Daily

by The New York Times
This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro and Sabrina Tavernise. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

The End of the Pandemic Emergency in the U.S.

The Biden administration said this week that it would end the public health emergency for Covid, a sign that federal officials believe that the pandemic has moved into a new, less dire phase.The move carries both symbolic weight and real-world consequences for millions of Americans.Guest: Apoorva Mandavili, a science and global health reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: The end of the public health emergency, planned for May, will bring about a complex set of policy changes and signals …

A Revolution in How Democrats Pick a President

For the past 50 years, the race to become the Democratic Party’s presidential nominee has been shaped by the where the contest begins: Iowa.But that process could soon be overhauled. In a coming meeting of the Democratic National Committee, South Carolina — a state that is more representative of the party and, possibly, of the country — could take over the key role of going first.Guest: Adam Nagourney, a West Coast cultural affairs correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: …

The State of the U.S. Economy in 4 Numbers

The typical sales price of an existing family home in the United States in December: 372,700. The number of layoffs in the tech sector since the beginning of the year: 76,000. The number by which consumer spending fell in December: 0.2 percent. The increase in the cost of the same kind of carton of eggs bought by an editor on “The Daily” a year apart: 251 percent.What do these numbers tell us about the state of the country’s economy?Guest: Ben …

7 States, 1 River and an Agonizing Choice

In the United States, 40 million people in seven states depend on water provided by the Colorado River.After 20 years of drought, the situation is dire and the river is at risk of becoming a “deadpool,” a condition in which there is not enough water to pass through the dams.The states were supposed to come up with a deal to cut their usage by Tuesday. Now, the federal government may have to step in and make a difficult decision.Guest: Christopher …

The Death of Tyre Nichols

This episode contains descriptions of violence and strong language.Tyre Nichols was a 29-year-old Black man who lived in Memphis. His mother described him as living a simple and pleasant life. He worked for FedEx, loved to skateboard, was an amateur photographer and had a 4-year-old son.On the evening of Jan. 7, after a traffic stop, Mr. Nichols was violently beaten by the police, sustaining severe injuries. He died on Jan. 10.For weeks, what exactly had happened was unclear. This weekend, …

The Sunday Read: ‘Has the Amazon Reached Its “Tipping Point”?’

In the past half-century, 17 percent of the Amazon — an area larger than Texas — has been converted to croplands or cattle pasture. Less forest means less recycled rain, less vapor to cool the air, less of a canopy to shield against sunlight. Under drier, hotter conditions, even the lushest of Amazonian trees will shed leaves to save water, inhibiting photosynthesis — a feedback loop that is only exacerbated by global warming.According to the Brazilian Earth system scientist Carlos …

Arrests, Executions and the Iranian Protesters Who Refuse to Give Up

This episode contains descriptions of violence and injury. In September, protests began in Iran over the death of a young woman, Mahsa Amini, at the hands of the government. The demonstrations have since intensified, as has the government’s response, with thousands arrested and a terrifying campaign of public executions underway.Today, Iranians who have taken part in the demonstrations tell us — in their own words — why they are willing to brave such severe punishments to help bring about change.Guest: …

An Aggressive New Approach to Childhood Obesity

Recent advice from the American Academy of Pediatrics has recommended a bold approach to treating the millions of children in the United States who are affected by obesity. Counseling, drug treatment and even surgery should be considered, the group says.The guidelines are a response to a deeper understanding of what obesity is — and what to do about it.Guest: Gina Kolata, a medical reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: The new guidelines have underscored how complicated childhood obesity is …

How Nonprofit Hospitals Put Profits Over Patients

Nonprofit hospitals — which make up around half of hospitals in the United States — were founded to help the poor.But a Times investigation has revealed that many have deviated from those charitable roots, behaving like for-profit companies, sometimes to the detriment of the health of patients.Guest: Jessica Silver-Greenberg, an investigative business reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: With the help of a consulting firm, the Providence hospital system trained staff members to wring money out of patients, even …

What Biden Miscalculated About His Classified Documents

Over the weekend, F.B.I. agents found classified documents at President Biden’s residence in Wilmington, Del., after conducting a 13-hour search.The search — at the invitation of Mr. Biden’s lawyers — resulted in the latest in a series of discoveries that has already led to a special counsel investigation.What miscalculations have Mr. Biden and his team make throughout this ordeal?Guest: Michael D. Shear, a White House correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: Inside the decision by Mr. Biden and his …